Prof. Andrew Tolmie

Prof. Andrew Tolmie is a professor of Psychology and Human Development at the UCL- Institute of Education.

Research Interests ‎

Prof. Andrew Tolmie is a developmental psychologist with longstanding interests in the development of children’s conceptual representations and behavioural skills, and the relationships between these. His research focuses primarily on the growth of children’s explicit knowledge, particularly in the pre-school and primary age range, on the role of dialogue with parents, tutors, teachers and peers in promoting this development, and on quantitative modelling of the impact of a range of influences on representational and behavioural change.

The majority of Prof. Tolmie’s research has addressed educationally-relevant topics and settings, with a substantial emphasis on primary school science, but also on the acquisition of road-crossing skills among children, and on the growth of conversational skills. He is currently Deputy Director of the IOE/UCL/Birkbeck Centre for Educational Neuroscience, and the lead Editor for the British Psychological Society’s Editorial Advisory Group. He was Editor of the British Journal of Educational Psychology from 2007 until the end of 2012.

Publications

Please see the list below for the most recent of Prof. Tolmie’s publications. More information about Prof. Tolmie including a more extensive publication list can be found here: Prof. Tolmie’s Publications 

  • Thomas, M.S.C, Kovas, Y., Meaburn, E. & Tolmie, A. (in press). What can the study of genetics offer to educators? Mind, Brain and Education.
  • Tolmie, A. (in press). Neuroscience of education. In J.D. Wright (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2nd Edition). Oxford: Elsevier.
  • Broadbent, H.J., Farran, E.K. & Tolmie, A. (2014). Egocentric and allocentric navigation strategies in Williams syndrome and typical development. Developmental Science, 17(6), 920-934. Click here. 
  • Broadbent, H.J., Farran, E.K. & Tolmie, A. (2014). Object-based mental rotation and visual perspective-taking in typical development and Williams syndrome. Developmental Neuropsychology, 39(3), 205-225. Click here
  • Mareschal, D., Butterworth, B. & Tolmie, A. (Eds.) (2014). Educational Neuroscience. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. 374pp. Click here.